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F14 General Utilities xosview

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Associate Professor Gregory R. Kriehn
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F14 xosview

xosview is another old favorite, and can be used to display the status of several system based parameters, including CPU usage, load average, memory usage, swap space usage, network usage (including NFS mounts), interrupts, and serial port status. I use it in conjunction with gkrellm and xload to monitor my overall system status. It gives me a quick visualization to see if my server is getting hammered, if I have a runaway process that is needlessly chewing up CPU cycles, and as a general check for the overall health of the computer. Unfortunately, development of xosview has slowed to a crawl over the years, although the latest source code does compile and keep tabs on the 2.6 version of the Linux kernel. For Fedora Core 5, someone went through trouble of creating an rpm specific to FC5 users:

ftp://ftp.tigress.co.uk/pub/gpl/5.0.0/xosview-1.8.3-1.tig1.fc5.i386.rpm

The source RPM file is also available, so for Fedora 8 I downloaded it, looked at the patches that were applied, and tweaked a couple of things to create a new RPM applicable to the current version of Fedora. From there, I helped move it back into Fedora 9 and 10, where it now resides. Use yum to install it:

~> sudo yum install xosview
Once finished, source your ~/.bashrc file:
~> source ~/.bashrc
and xosview is ready to be launched:
~> xosview &
Preferences for xosview can be set in your ~/.Xresources file. I have differing preferences for my server and laptop:

Server Preferences

xosview*NFSDStats:      True
xosview*NFSStats:       True
xosview*battery:        False
xosview*net:            True
xosview*interrupts:     False
Laptop Preferences

xosview*NFSStats:       True
xosview*battery:        True
xosview*net:            True
xosview*interrupts:     False
Once set, use xrdb to load your preferences into memory.
~> xrdb ~/.Xresources
The next time you launch xosview, you will see your preferences take effect. Look at the man page to view the myriad of configuration options, if you wish to add or subtract from those listed above.